1990 CALIFORNIA H.S.CHAMPIONSHIP CROSS COUNTRY SURVEY

Arroyo
Coach Tim O'Rourke – 1850 students – boys coach – Tim has coached 10 years at Arroyo – He ran high school and junior college cross country – 52 boys made up his team in 1987 when they won the State Meet. In 1987 the team ran the fastest team time (77:05) ever run at Woodward Park.  They were the Southern Section Champs, Mt. SAC Sweepstakes, and Stanford Invit. Champs.

El Toro
Coach Ric Hagin – 2100students – boy's coach – Rick has been the head coach the past 4 years and has coached for a total of 16 years.  He ran in high school and college.  32 boys made up the El Toro boys team – El Toro finished 7th in the State Meet Division 1, 2nd in the SS CIF-1A, and South Coach League Champs.

 Fillmore
Coach Epi Torres – 840 students – Epi coaches both the boys and girls – He has coaches at Fillmore for 16 years – He ran in high school and college – 28 runners made up the team – The boys won the State Meet Division IV and 4AA SSCIF Championship.
 

Hart
Coach Gene Blankenship – 2133 students – Gene coached both squads – He has coached at Hart for 9 years and ran in college and high school – Hart was the State Meet Division 1 Boys Champions.

 Madera
Coach Dee Dewitt – 2690 – He has coached for 27 years at Madera – Dee had no high school or collegiate running experience – 60 boys and 15 girls make up the team – this survey was completed in 1989 when the boys finished 4th in the State Meet – In 1990 they finished 2nd in Division 1 along with being Section Champs.

 San Luis Obispo
Coach Steve Boaz – 1207 students – Steve coaches both boys and girls – He has been a SLO for the last 4 years and coached for a total of 10 years – He ran in high school and college – 27 boys and 22 girls made up the SLO team – The boys finished 2nd in their Section and 8th in the State Meet Division III – the girls finished 4th in the Southern Section finals (3A)

 San Pasqual
Coach Will Wester – 1721 students – He coaches both teams and has been at San Pasqual for 13 years – Will ran in high school and college – 37 girls and 43 boys ran on each team – The boys were the San Diego Section Champs and State Meet Division II champs (fastest team time of the meet) – the girls won the Section championship and State Meet Division II with the second fastest team of the meet)
 

Taft
Coach Mel Hein – 3200 students – Mel Coaches both teams – He has been at Taft the last 4 years – He has been at Taft the last 4 years – He did not run cross country in high school or college (Pole Vaulter) – 29 boys ran for – '89 LA City Champs and 9th in State Meet – 1990 they finished 6th at the State Meet Division I.

 Anderson
Coach John Morton – 925 students – John coaches both teams – He has been at Anderson the past 5 years and has coached for 13 years – He did not run in high school or college – 17 boys and 8 girls ran for Anderson – The girls finished third in the State Meet Division IV.

El Capitan
Coach Bill Cleves – 1720 students – Bill coaches the girls – the last 4 years have been at El Capitan – He ran in high school  (Helix) and College (Grossmont and UCLA) – 25 girls ran on the team – They finished 5th at the State Meet Division II, and second in the San Diego Section.

 Fallbrook

Coach Gary Lutendorf – 2000 students – Gary coaches the girls – He has been at Fallbrook for 6 years – Did not run in high school or college – 27 girls ran for Fallbrook – Soph Milena Glusac ran 17:54 at the State Meet in Division II for third – The team finished third in the San Diego Sections Finals.

Irvine
Coach Randy Rossi – 2177 students – Randy coaches the girls – He has been at Irvine the past 11 years.  He did not run in high school or college – 20 girls ran for the team this year – Irvine placed 4th in the State Meet Division 1, Second Place South Section CIF Div. 1A, Orange County Champions and South Coast League Champions.

 Nordoff
Coach Ken Reeves – 818 students – Ken coach both teams – 6 years at Nordoff and 9 years total – He played soccer at UCSB – 21 girls ran on the team – Stat Meet Division IV Champs and Southern Section 4AA Champs.

 Tustin
Coach Tom Coffey – 1800 students – Tom coaches both teams – he has been at Tustin for 18 years and ran in high school and college – 25 boys and 25 girls made up the squad – The girls placed 6th in the State Meet Division II, and 2nd place Southern Section CIF 2AA.


SUMMER TRAINING
:

1.         What was the average training mileage per week for your top 7?           

Arr

35 miles (July); 45 miles (August); 60 miles September

ElT

35-40 miles

Fil

40 miles

Har

50-55 miles (boys); 40-45 (girls)

Mad

40 miles

SLO

40 miles (boys); 30 miles (girls)

SP

25 miles (boys); 20 miles (girls)

Taf

50 miles

And

25-35 miles

ElC

10-30 miles

Fal

15-20 miles

Irv

25-30 miles

Nor

6 miles (June); 35-40 miles (Sept)

Tus

40 miles

2. How many times per week did the team meet for workouts?

Arr

5 times

ElT

5 times

Fil

5 times

Har

5 times

Mad

5 times

SLO

5 times

SP

2 times (Monday and Thursday)

Taf

3-4 times

And

6 times

ElC

None as a team

Fal

None as a team

Irv

5 times (mornings)

Nor

2 times July-August; 5 last 2 weeks of summer

Tus

5 times

3. What date did you start your summer training program?

Arr

June 22

EIT

July 15

Fil

End of August

Har

June 3

Mad

August 18

SLO

July 1

SP

July 1

Taf

July 15

And

July 1

EIC

August 1

Fal

July 1

Irv

July 27

Nor

July 15

Tus

July 15

  1. Did your team have a training camp?

Arr

No

EIT

Yes

Fil

No

Har

Yes

Mad

Yes

SLO

Yes

SP

Yes

Taf

Yes (twice)

And

No

Fal

No

Irv

Yes

Nor

Yes

Tus

Yes

  1. If so, how many days did it last?

EIT

5 days

Har

10 days

Mad

5 days

SLO

5 days

SP

5 days

Taf

4 days & 5 days

Irv

6 days

Nor

5 days

Tus

6 days

  1. Where was it held?

EIT

Big Bear

Har

Utah

Mad

Mammouth Lakes                  

SLO

Donner Lake (Truckee, CA)

SP

Catalina Island

Taf

Yosemite and Arrowhead

Irv

Catalina Island

Nor

El Capitan Beach (north of Santa Barbara)

Tus

Big Bear

 

 

  1. Was it at Altitude?

EIT

Yes (6800 ft)

Har

Yes

Mad

Yes (8500 ft)

SLO

Yes (6000 ft)

SP

No

Taf

Yes (5000 ft)

Irv

No

Nor

No

Tus

Yes (7000 ft)

  1. How much running took place at your camp?

EIT

2 miles a day

Har

80 miles (boys); 60 miles (girls)

Mad

12 miles per day

SLO

8 miles in one workout

SP

3-7 miles by choice of the athlete

Taf

10 miles in 2 workouts

Irv

Moderate mileage (in two workouts)

Nor

We trained 4 days and had a time trial on the fifth. 

 

Three days included 2 workouts each day.

Tus

Maximum of 70 miles/2 workouts per day

  1. How much racing did your athletes participate in during the summer?

Arr       About once a week during the first six weeks of summer.  No racing from August 10 until the start of the season.  This is so they are mentally hungry during the season.

EIT

One race.

Fil

None

Har

None

Mad

14 meets

SLO

None

SP

None

Taf

None

And

None

EIC

None

Fal

None

Irv

None

Nor

None as a team.  A few ran 5k's.

Tus

3-5 races.

 

 

   

10.  Did your athletes do any interval training during summer?  

Arr

No

EIT

No

Fil

No

Har

Boys (Fartlek type); Girls (880 to 1 ½ mile)

Mad

  No

SLO

 No

SP

 No

Taf

 No

And

 No

EIC

 No

Fal

 No

Irv

 No

Nor

Our only form of speed is 6 strides at the end Of our runs, negative split runs, telephone pole Surges and ultimate Frisbee.

Tus

No

 

  12.

If so, could you describe the interval training and make a comment on your approach to it at this time of the year?

12.  What part did hill training play during the summer?

Arr

We tried to do a hill workout once a week.

EIT

After 2 weeks of base, we begin hills and develop strength through hill running.  By the start of school we are running 3-4 days of hills.

Har

We run one to two days a week in the hills from 4 to 8miles.

Mar

20-30%

SLO

We do one hilly run each week.

SP

We subscribe to a steady diet of hill running near the end of summer.

Taf

Lots of distance runs with hills.

And

None

EIC

We live in a hilly area, so the kids do hilly road runs, but no formal hill training.

Fal

Plenty, Fallbrook is very hilly.

Irv

Easy distance training over rolling hills.

Nor

At least one run a week with hills.

Tus

Road runs had hills every other day.

 

13.  How many of your athletes ran twice a day during the summer?

Arr

None

EIT

None

Fil

None 

Har

Team is asked to bike, swim, or run a 2nd workout 3 times a week.

Mad

None

SLO

None

SP

None

Taf

None

And

None

EIC

None

Fal

None 

Irv

None

Nor

None

Tus

None

 

 

  1. Do you have additional thoughts on summer training?

 

Arr

Summer has got to be voluntary.  It is the only way to insure that the athletes stay fresh and excited about the season.  It also creates an atmosphere of self-generated goal.

Har

Most important time for training a high school runner.

Mad

Our kids are usually working (family support) all summer

SLO

I feel a summer training program is essential to a successful cross-country season.  But the focus is on consistency and the quality and quantity of the workouts progress gradually from week to week, month to month, year to year.

SP

I try to teach my athletes to use summer running as a maintenance program to which I will add the main course throughout the seasonal training runs.

EIC

I advise the kids to run over the summer, and I give everyone a workout schedule.  But I don't put pressure on the kids to run.  I will meet with them on occasion.

 

RACING SEASON:

 

  1. Date your team ran their first race of the season:

 

 

Arr

September 12

EIT

September 15

Fil

September 8

Har

September 8  

Mad

September 20

SLO

September 16

SP

September 8

Taf

September 16

And

September 6

EIC

September 8

Fal

Second week of September

Irv

September 15

Nor

September 8

Tus

First week of September

  1. Date of your Championship race:

All teams participated in the California State Meet on November 24.

17.  How many total races did your team run during the competitive season?

Arr

12

Fil

11

Har

14

Mad

14

SLO

10

SP

12

Taf

15

And

14

EIC

11

Fal

10

Irv

14

Nor

14 (no runner ran more than 11)

Tus

15

 18.  What number of races were 100% mental and physical efforts?

Arr

10-12

 

EIT

5-6

 

Fil

3

 

Har

5

 

Mad

6

 

SLO

3-5

 

SP

3-4

 

Taf

7

 

And

5

 

EIC

4

 

Fal

3

 

Irv

10

 

Tus

7

 

19.  Did you team ever "train through" a meet?

Arr

Never trained through a meet.

EIT

Yes

Fil

Yes

Har

Yes

Mad

Yes

SLO

Yes

SP

No

Taf

Yes

And

Yes

EIC

Yes

Fal

Yes

Irv

No

Nor

Yes

Tus

No

 

20.  If so, what was typical about the (training through)

 day before the meet workout?

 

EIT

6 miles with 5x440's (220 jog between)

Fil

Distance run

Har

5-8 miles of running (sometimes speed work - short sprints).

Mad

90% of regular workout

SLO

Maintain normal distance mileage. 3 mile run; 20 minutes stretching; 3 mile run; 20 minutes stretching.

Taf

7-8 miles.

And

3-4 miles.

EIC

4 mile run; 8-110x220's (55 yd jog). 10 minute jog cool down.

Fal

3-4 miles.

Nor

1.25 mile warm-up; stretch; 6 strides hard; 880 at starting race pace; they go straight into a 2.5 mile run with a major hill in it (similar to Mt. Sac's poop-out); 880 at finish race pace; 1.25 mile warm-down pace.

 

21.  What was a typical "training session" the day before a meet of some importance?

Arr

2 mile warm-up, 20-30 minutes of stretching, 8x110 strides, 1 mile strides and jogging, 1 mile cool-down.

EIT

3 miles

Fil

2 mile jog, stretch, & strides

Har

1-mile jog, 2 miles of sprinting straights and jogging curves on track, 1-mile jog.

Mad

Warm-up, 8 strides, mile run, cool-down.

SLO

One 3-mile run and stretching.

SP

I usually give a choice of 200m strides, 100m ins-n-outs or an easy three-mile jog with strides after.

Taf

Stretch and strides.

And

Mental preparation for the meet, then silence during the run.

EIC

15 minute jog, stretching, 8-10x110 strides, 1 mile cool-down.

Fal

Talk and stretch.

Irv

Stretch, easy 3-mile job, 4-6x100m strides.

Tus

Jog/Fartlek 2 miles.

 

 

  1. What adverse climatic conditions did your team have

To contend with and how did you overcome the situation?

Arr

Smog.  We train late in the afternoon (5:00 pm).

EIT

Heat, dry and windy.  We ran through it.

Fil

Hot weather.  Drank liquids and ran late.

Har

Heat.

Mad

Heat. Ran at 6:30 pm.

SLO

Weather conditions are ideal.

SP

Heat. On a specific quality workout, I tell the kids the day before and we run under the lights in the park or on the track.  If it were an average effort workout, I would taper off the volume. 

Taf

Heat & smog.  Trained through it.  Also we would hydrate the day before.

And

Hot and dry.  We ran in the heat of the day once school began.

EIC

Heat, we workout in the heat.  I advise the kids to drink a lot during the week.

Fal

Heat. Water and shade, with a slower running pace.

Irv

Heat and smog.  Team ice water after workout in the training room.

Nor

Heat.  10-15 days are over 100 degrees.  We run through to climatize.  Hydrate before and after workouts.

Tus

Rain.  Run in gym or do step-ups on bench.

 

 

  1. What was the average training mileage per week for your top 7 runners?

School             September                October                       November

Arr

45-55 miles

45-50 miles

45-55 miles

 

EIT

40-45 miles

35-40 mi

33-36 mi

 

Fil

40 mi

35 mi

        

 35 mi

Har

40-45 miles

35-40 mi

30-35 mi

 

Mad

45 mi

40 mi

35 mi

 

SLO

40 mi

40 mi

        

30 mi

SP

37 mi

                       

37 mi.

25 mi

SP

30 mi (girls

30 mi

18 mi

 

 

Taf

50 mi

40-50 mi

40-50 mi

 

And

30 mi

30 mi

 

 

25 mi

EIC

25-45 mi

30-45 mi

25-35 mi

 

Fal

25 mi

30 mi

15-20 mi 

 

Irv

30-35 mi

25-30 mi

25-30 mi

 

Nor

33 mi

38 mi

30 mi

 

Tus

40 mi

35 mi

25-30 mi

 

24. How many of your top seven ran twice-a-day workouts?

Arr

6

EIT

None

Fil

None

Har

?

Mad

None

SLO

None

SP

1 (seniors only)

Taf

None

And

None

EIC

None

Fal

None

Irv

None

Nor

None

Tus

6

  1. How many days of twice-a-day workouts during the week were average?

Arr

2-3 times

SP

2 times

Tus

3 times

  1. What was their average mileage for the extra workout?

Arr

20 minutes in Sept.; 25 minutes in October; 30 minutes in November.

Tus

4 miles

  1. Did they continue throughout the entire season?

Arr

Yes

SP

Stopped one week before league finals, or 3 weeks before the State Meet.

Tus

Yes, except the last week.

 

  1. How many days of easy running did your team take before the Championship race?

Arr

Did not change normal schedule for championship.

EIT

None, did not taper.

Fil

4 days

Har

2-3 days

Mad

2-3 days

SLO

2-3 days

SP

3 days

Taf

2-3 days

And

1 day

EIC

2 days

Fal

2 days

Irv

2 days

Nor

2-3 days

Tus

2 days (2 with no running)

 

  1. How many tops 7 ran some type of workout on Sunday during the season?  What was a typical workout?

Arr

All 7; a long run.

EIT

None

Fil

1; 6 miles

Har

2-3; 8-12 miles

Mad

4; 5-6 miles easy flat run.

SLO

3; 6-12 miles

SP

None

Taf

All 7; 115-130 minute run

And

2; Long slow run

EIC

4; 20-40 minutes easy.

Fal

None

Irv

3-6; easy distance run.

Nor

6-7; 45-60 minute runs in the hills.

Tus

None

 

  1. What venues do you have available for team training?  (Asphalt city street; rural streets; dirt roads; dirt trails; beach sand; hills; grass park; grass field at school; bike trails; other)

Arr

We have a horse trail that is all dirt.  Everything else is road.  We have a grass trail field that has an 800-meter perimeter.  There is not a hill of any kind within 6 miles of the school.

EIT

asphalt, dirt, bike trails, and sand.

Fil

No sand or grass.

Har

Asphalt, dirt roads & trails, hills and grass park.

Mad

Dirt roads & trails, hills, grass park, and grass field at school.

SLO

Mostly asphalt and dirt roads, some dirt trails and hard packed sand.

SP

We have it all.  There is a 70-acre city park right across the street.  We can get a flat ten miler in or a hilly run as long or short as desired.  The area is ideal for cross-country.

Taf

All but beach sand.

And

Dirt roads & trails; 50% hills, with no large parks.

EIC

Rural roads, trails, grass and riverbed sand.

Fal

Rural streets, dirt roads, hills, grass field at school and running track.

Irv

Asphalt, grass park, bike trail, and some dirt trails.  We have to transport the team to run on dirt hills.

Nor

all types of terrain. The majority of our running is done on rural roads or bike trails.

Tus

Asphalt city streets, rural streets, dirt trails, hills and grass park.

 

  1. On the average, what pace per mile did your team run on 5 mile runs? 10 mile runs?

Arr

(boys)

5 mile=5:15 to 5:30      10 mile=under 6:00

EIT

(boys)

6:15 to 7:30        6:30 to 7:45

Fil

(boys)

7:00

Har

(boys)

As you feel

Mad

(boys)

5:30 to 5:45        none run

SLO

(boys)

6:30 to 7:30 (easy)         6:00 to 7:30

 

 

5:30 to 6:30 (tempo)

 

(Girls)

8:00 to 9:00 (easy)

 

 

7:00 to 8:00 (tempo)       7:00 to 8:00

SP           

Most of the 5-7 mile runs are as they feel.  Usually I have them stay in a group for at least half of the run.  Often I assign various speeds for the different terrains or sections of the run.  I try to individualize the emphasized part of the distance run to address the athlete's weakness.  Seldom do the boys run farther than nine miles at one time, and the girls seldom run further than six miles at one time.

Taf

(boys

7:00

And

(girls)

9:00

EIC

(girls)

6:30 to 8:00 (we never went longer than 8 miles.)

Fal

(girls)

7:30 to 8:15                    8:00 to 9:00

Irv

(girls)

7:00 to 8:00                    8:00 to 9:00

Nor

(girls)

Conversational pace – up to miles 7:00 for timed loop

Tus

(girls)

7:00                               8:30

     
  1. Did your team repeat the same training run frequently during the season?

Arr

Yes

 

EIT

 

Very seldom

Fil

 

Yes

Har

 

Yes

Mad

 

Yes

SLO

 

Yes

SP

We avoid using any workout repeatedly.  We do have a four-mile loop that is half dirt and half asphalt which the team seems to favor and run frequently when given a choice.

Taf

Yes

 

And

 

No

EIC

 

Yes

Fal

 

No

Irv

 

No

Nor

 

We repeat runs during the season, but we tried not to repeat the same run in a 2-week cycle.

Tus

Yes

 

  1. How many different training runs did your team have available between the 5 and 12 mile distance?

 

Arr

Really only one so that we could stay off the road.

EIT

10 (15 more in surrounding area)

Fil

14

Har

8

Mad

4-5

SLO

10

SP

15-20

Taf

5-6

And

8

EIC

A multitude

Fal

8

Irv

Many

Nor

20

Tus

10-20

  1. Describe your athletes' favorite distance run (distance, terrain, and the nature of the run).

 

Arr

Run up our horse trail.  It is all dirt and flat.

Fil

8 miles; flat long paved run with one major hill and water stops.

Mad

7 mile run at the dam; hill and dirt trails.

SLO    

The two favorite loops are Poly Canyon, which is 75% dirt road/trail with a 3-mile grade (the last mile being quite steep), and Morro Rock, which is a run on the hard packed sand at the beach.

SP       

The boys favor the runs that loop out and end up back at school.  The terrain usually is moderately hilly, with much of it on asphalt.  The gals favor the park area runs, which usually venture out into the rural housing areas and are about half dirt/asphalt.  The favorite long run (8 miler) is one on which I van them out to an academy and they run back to the school almost exclusively on dirt/sand trails.

Taf

Arrowhead runs on hills and dirt.

And     

5-7 miles on Forestry Service roads of a variety of hills around Shasta Lake.

EIC     

Run involves trails along a riverbed; some hilly trails; 2 miles of rural roads.

Fal

4 miles; rural flat road.

Irv       

 

6 mile run on asphalt and dirt trail.  This is a team run where the group stays together.

 

Nor     

 

 

5.5 mile run; On this run there is .75 mile of a steady uphill, .75 of a steady down hill, 2 miles of rolling terrain on a shaded country road and 2 miles of up and down on a bike path.  The other favorite and most challenging is a hill over one mile in length with a very steady uphill for just over .24 of a mile. At the very top of this is a fire road that winds for 1.8 miles above the city of Ojai.  This trail/road has many ups and downs and always seems to have a cool breeze.  After the trail, there is a steep downhill curved portion on asphalt for just over 200 yards.  The next mile is a straight shot going gradually down the same road.  A sharp left puts us on a very level road for about 1.5 miles.  The last mile winds us through a very expansive and shaded area with little traffic.

Tus

 

6 miles; with some hills, asphalt or 8-9 miles on horse trails and hills

 

 

  1. Do your athletes run a many miles today s they did 5 and 10 years ago?

Arr

We run 10% to 15% more miles today.

 

EIT

Yes

.

Fil

No.

 

Har

No, we run less.

 

Mad

Yes.

 

SLO

The athletes I train don't run as much as I did in HS (70-100 miles), but I would like to see more of them running 50-70 miles during their junior and senior years.

SP

The run 1/3 less.

 

And

more today.

 

EIC

Girls yes, boys no.

 

Fal

Yes.

 

Irv

Yes.

 

Nor

More. Our mileage depends on the experience of our runners at the time.

Tus

No.

 

 

  1. Do you have any additional thoughts on over distance training?

Arr

There is no such thing as an easy distance run unless it is a recovery day.  All long runs should be hard.  Additionally, on any run we do, each step a runner takes has to be at least as fast as the previous one.  In other words, when you pick up the pace on a run you must hold at least that pace until the end.  You can never slow down.

EIT

I believe in variety to challenge athletes mentally.  I rarely do the same course or training run more that 2 times.  I believe variety is what makes our program unique.  We will drive to areas to run different paths and courses.

Har

 A long run must be run once a week to keep endurance up all season.

Mad

We run quality workouts and not quantity.

SLO

Over distance training is the primary focus of my athletes and should be for all teenage runners.  Developing the VO2 capacity is our primary goal, followed by developing the muscular skeletal capacity, and thirdly the development of the anaerobic systems.

SP

I feel that the main reason we run distance is endurance maintenance.  Usually the stress is low and the body gains a measure of recovery from the previous quality workouts.

EIC

I don't believe in over distance for young developing kids.  I place my emphasis on shorter faster road runs.  And Gradually increase the distance over the athletes 4 years with me.

Fal

Very important for athlete's confidence.

Irv

We rarely run more than 70 minutes.

Nor

On meet days, we usually do our "big mileage".  We do a full course warm up before the meet, and then run the meet.  Then after the conclusion of each race, the team that just finished does a 1 to 2 mile warm-down on their own.  At the conclusion of the entire meet, the entire team does a 2 to 4 mile warm-down.  We try to sell the idea that we are not a big mileage team, but that we do a tremendous amount of quality work on hills and hill runs.  We try to sell the idea that therefore, we are "fresher" than our opponents on race day.

  

INTERVAL TRAINING:

  1. How many times during the typical week would your team do interval training:

Arr

Interval training once a week unless we had to race that week, then no interval training.

EIT

Once.

Fil

Twice.

Har

Once.

Mad

Once.

SLO

Once.

SP

One time per week after the first three weeks of the season.

Taf

3 times.

And

Once.

EIC

Early season = once; lat season=twice

Fal

Once.

Irv

Once.

Nor

Once.

Tus

Once or twice.

  

  1. What distance(s) and on what surface did you find most beneficial?

Arr

Building from 400m intervals in the beginning to repeat miles in the final weeks.  All our intervals were done on the inside of our track on grass.

EIT

400 through mile repeat.  Ran on bike trail, cross-country course, and track.

Fil

Repeat miles and 440's run on dirt track.

Har

800m run on dirt track and park.

Mad

400m and 800m run on grass and in park.

SLO

1200m-1600m and tapering down to 400m run on dirt, grass, and synthetic tracks.

PS

Between 400m and one mile.  Over 1200m are infrequent.

Taf

800m and 1200m run on dirt track and grass at the park.

And

800m run on grass and mostly on synthetic track.

EIC

Second half of season on the track; 330, 220 and 165's

Fal

880's run on the track.

Irv

400m, 800m and 1 mile run on grass and dirt in the park.

Nor

800 run grass, trails or our dirt track.

Tus

400m to 1200m run on grass with some cement.

  1. How much total mileage did your average interval workout involve (not including warm-up, warm down, or rest  phase)?

Arr

Starting at 3 miles in early season to five miles in late season.

EIT

3-4 miles.

Fil

3-4 miles

Har

3 miles.

Mar

3-4  for 880's and 2-3 for 440's

SLO

2-3 miles per week

SP

3 miles early and half of that late in the year.

Taf

5-6 miles.

And

3 miles.

EIC

1.5 – 2 miles.

Fal

2.5 – 3 miles.

Irv

3 miles.

Nor

1.5 – 3 miles.

Tus

3 miles

 

  1. Did your top 7 athletes walk, jog or stand during the rest phase of internal training?

Arr

Jog.

EIT

Walk and jog depending on time of year and workout.

Fil

Jog.

Har

Jog.

Mad

Jog and stand (1/2 and ½).

SLO

Walk or jog.

SP

 Shuffle jog.

Taf

Walk-jog.

And

Walk-jog and stretch.

EIC

Jog.

Fal

Walk.

Irv

Stand and occasionally jog.

Nor

Jog.

Tus

Walk with some job.

 

  1. What did you try to accomplish with your interval workouts? (Comment on your approach to endurance training, pace training, and speed training when using interval training).

Arr

In the early season we are trying to learn pace and relaxation.  From the middle of the season to late season we are trying to increase ability to handle as faster pace as same level of relaxation.

EIT

(1) Increase workload so as to produce lactic acid and increased heart rate to better simulate race setting.  (2) To be able to learn to experience fast running; to be able to know what to do in stress situations and develop confidence. (3) Learn to pace yourself. (4) Part of process in reaching peak performance. (5) Practice "fast" group/pack running.

Fil

I use mile repeats to simulate race conditions and 440's to work on running fast and relaxed (non-timed)

Har

The ability to run without air and to understand what race pace for 3 miles I like.

SP

The early phase teaches pacing acumen.  Once I feel they "know" their race pace, I usually administer the work out at their mile to mile and half race pace.

Taf

We try to accomplish leg speed, to go with surges in races; also to stay relaxed.

And

160-180 heart rate with recoveries so that they get back down to 90 beats/min.

EIC

On the track during cross-country, we are working on holding form at a quicker tempo.  I always keep the rest short, and usually throw in something challenging in the middle to that the kids are forced to hold form when they are hurting.

Fal

Running together and recovering from oxygen debt.

Irv

The goal of the interval training is to develop speed while simulating race conditions.  We set goal pace and work on consistency.  Another goal of interval training is to foster and develop mental toughness.

Nor

We try to accomplish three different aspects with three different interval workouts.  In the early portion of the season, we are trying to teach the runners pace.  In the middle portion of the season, we are working on building speed and increasing the anaerobic threshold.  In the latter portion of the season, we are building confidence by having the runners start and finish faster than the normal.

Tus

Intensity/controlled recovery.

  1. Do you have any additional thoughts on interval training?

Arr

Most of the top seven must run intervals together.  This is done even if it means having the front group run at a bit slower than capable pace.

EIT

We use interval training one time per week beginning the first week of school.  The distances are gradually increased during the season with shorter and increased speed the last 2 weeks of the season.

Har

 Interval training is important but must be kept under control and not getting carried away with it.

SLO

The focus on intervals starts with the development of aerobic/anaerobic endurance, during the first month (Sept) of intervals we use longer intervals (1200-1600).  Next we drop to 800m to focus more on anaerobic threshold development.  And during the last month we drop to 400m

SP

In generally use a modified form of interval training.  I use it early as a base, but then progress to a combo interval/fartlek type menu of work.

Nor

Speed days for us are very short on the track or grass.  We try to keep the mileage up by using a long warm up and long warm down.  In the early portion of the season, our recovery is only 440.  When we are trying to increase the times, we decrease the number of intervals and increase the distance of the recovery run.  Thus, the runners usually come away feeling extremely happy after a late season session the grass or track.

Tus

Recovery is controlled most of the time.

 

 FARTLEK TRAINING:

  1. Did you use any fartlek (speed play) training during the season?  How often did you use it?

Arr

Yes, usually on a recovery day or a rest day or a workout designed to work on surging or reacting to surges.

EIT

Yes, about once a week, either fartlek or interval.

Fil

No.

Har

Yes, every other week.

Mad

yes, 10 to 15% of the time.

SLO

No.

SP

Yes, San Pasqual relies heavily on fartlek training.

And

Yes, once a week.

EIC

 Yes, at least once a week.

Far

Yes, once every 2 weeks.

Irv,

Yes, once a week.

Nor

Yes, once every other week.

Tus

Yes, about every 1-½ weeks.

 

  1. What distance for the total workout did you find most beneficial?  Describe the location of your fartlek sessions ?

Arr

5-8 miles on our grass field or horse trail.

EIT

6-8 miles on bike trail, hills, or cross country course.

Har

4-6 miles on grass park, dirt trails, and hills.

Mad

7 miles flat dirt road.

SP

We work at all distances, on the track, in the park, on the roads.  It works everywhere as a whole workout or part of the workout.

EIC

6-8 miles in park with rolling dirt hills and some asphalt.

Fal

4-5 miles on rural streets.

Irv

5-7 miles on asphalt and dirt rails.

Nor

5-6 miles; early season we do whistle fartlek on the grass for 5 minutes. The better runners do 4 of these.

Tus

5 miles or less. Parks, track, and roads are used

.

  1. Describe a typical fartlek session that your team has used.  What did you try to accomplish   from this workout?

Arr

Two to three mile warm-up.  Distance of strides or surges varied.  Rest equal to distance or surge.

EIT

In a local park, jog 5 minutes.  Stretch as a group for 15 minutes. Run for 10 minutes at 7:20-7:40   pace. Run the following distance with equal time of  resting. Job: 1 minute; 2min.; 3 min.; 4 min.; 5 min.; 4 min.; 3 min.; 2 min. Easy 5 minutes warm down.  (About 60 minute workout).  The idea behind this is to increase time for pacing as you tire and to have equal recovery time.  When it is run over a cross-country course the speed and recovery run are run over different terrain and different footpaths.  Another is an 8 mile run where we run uphill at race pace and easy on flat and downhill.

Har

Timed runs of 30 seconds, 45 sec.; 1 min.; 2 min.; and 3 min.

Mad

Whistle runs of slow, medium, hard, and super hard.

SP

On the road our athletes often break the run into sections and then work at various aspects of that run depending on their strength/weakness capabilities.  This is often done in parts or trios.  If it is a controlled workout, I divide the area into sections and assign percentages of effort to a given section.

And

Indian run, whistle drill, and surges.

EIC

15-minute warm-up; 1320 loop of second surges with 10-second jog rests.  One-minute rest; 1-mile loop or 30-second surges with 30-second jog.  During this set one of the girls would do a 10 second pickup during each surge.  The other girls were to react to the surge.  Who did the surge would rotate and could fall anywhere in the 60 second surge.  Two-minute rest.  1320 loop (for girls that could handle it) of 30 second (race pace) with 10 sec. jog.  10 minute cool down.

Fal

Surges for 1-3 minutes trying to stay with the leader.

Irv

Indian file running, statue of liberty running, and on command fartlek running.

Nor

During the middle of the season we use telephone pole surges (1 to 6 pole, dictated by the person who starts the surge) or machine gun surges (55 seconds, 44 seconds, etc. again dictated by the person who starts the surge).  In the latter portion of the season, we use cue card surges. Here, the runners pull a card.  This card tells them that their surge should be and what kind of terrain this surge should be on.  Usually, their goal is to attempt to drop the coach on these surges.  This is often one of our most enjoyable and challenging workouts of the year.  Another fartlek workout we do is an orienteering run where runners are given a map with 10 different checkpoints.  This is a timed activity with prizes for the fastest times and the most checkpoints reached in the time limit.

Tus

On the road run each runner names a spot and the team sprints to it.

 

  1. Do you have any additional thoughts on fartlek training?

Har

Must be done under control program with high school kids to receive maximum benefits.

SLO

Although I have used this type of training in the past, I have not utilized it this year.  I do feel fartlek training cam be a useful method of interval training for the well-disciplined athlete.

SP

This is the base of the San Pasqual in season training.

EIC

I think it is the key to successful cross-country racing.

HILL TRAINING:

  1. Did you use hill training during the past season? How many different hills did you use for these workouts? What was the length of the hills you have available.

Arr

There are really only two places that we can drive to get on hills.  One is Mt. SAC and the other is the Garcia Trail, which is a 7-mile mountain trail.  Mt. SAC is three of hills and Garcia is 7 miles (we don't run the down hill part of the trail).

EIT

Yes, the hills varied from 50 yards to 440 yards.

Fil

Yes, three hills from 500, 1320 to 2.8 miles long.

Har

Yes, 10 different hills 200 to 800 yards in length.  We have one run that is 4 miles up that we do controlled fartlek on.

Mad

Yes, 50 yards to 400 yards.

SLO

Yes, hill training is an integral part of our training at SLO. We utilize 2 hills within our over distance training runs, these are 1-2 miles in length, as well as three 200-800m hills on which we do reps.

SP

Yes, we use five different hills regularly for repeat type work, and fifteen different hill runs incorporated into the various road runs.

Taf

Yes, 4-5 hills from ½ to Ύ mile in length.

And

 Yes, dozens of hills from 50 yards to 400 yards.

EIC

Yes, every 2 weeks we did specific hill work, we do a lot of hills on road days and emphasize pushing the fills on the runs.  There are 2 areas of hills with runs being 15 seconds to 60 seconds in length.

Fal

Yes, 5 hills with lengths of 200-400 meters.

Irv

Yes, 8 hills from 100 meters to 1 mile.

Nor

Yes, hill work is the major portion of our program.  We try to incorporate some kind of hill work daily. The hills are from 220-500 yards and a steady uphill over a mile.

Tus

Yes, many hills from 200 yards to 500 yards.

 

  1. How much total mileage did your average hill training involve (not including warm-up, warm down, jogging down hill, or rest phase)?

Arr

4-7 miles.

EIT

2-3 miles.

Fil

One mile.

Har

3 miles.

Mad

3-6 miles

SLO

2-3 miles

SP

Not over 3 miles.

And

1-2 miles.

Fal

3-5 miles.

Irv

4-5 miles

Nor

½ to1 mile.

Tus

One mile.

 

  1. How often did you use hill training? Were your typical hill workouts repeated hill runs or continuous distance runs?

Arr

Once every two weeks; repeat and continuous.

EIT

1-2 times per week; repeat and continuous

Fil

 once a week; repeat and continuous

Har

Once every other week; (summertime-continuous; in-season-repeats and fartlek on 4 mile hill run).

Mad

1-2 times per week; most continuous with some repeats.

SLO

A typical interval workout on hills would consist of 2-6 800m reps or 4-12 400m reps totaling 1-3 miles of work.  A typical over distance workout would be a 7-9 mile runs with one hill ½ - 3 miles in length.  We run these workouts once a week; hill intervals alternating with flat intervals, and hilly over distance alternating with flat over distance.

PS

Twice a week. Once in a repeat type workout and once incorporated into the road/distance runs.

Taf

3 times a week; continuous runs.

And

Once a week; mostly continuous runs.

EIC

Every two weeks; repeat and continuous

Fal

Early season-twice a week; repeat hills.

Irv

5 times during the season; early season-continuous and repeat during late season.

Nor

Repeats and a continuous run once a week.

Tus

Once a week; both repeat and continuous

 

  1. How late in the season did you continue using hill training?

Arr

All season.

EIT

Through the 3rd week of October.

Fil

Up to the last 2 weeks.

Har

Week of the State Meet.

Mad

 Up to the last 2 weeks.

SLO

Hill training is maintained up until the last 2-4 weeks.

SP

Repeat hills until the week before league finals; distance runs on the road continued only rolling shorter hills.

Taf

Up until a week before the City Meet.

And

Ran all the way through the season.

Fal

4th week.

Irv

The last hill run was held 2 weeks prior to the Southern Section CIF Prelims.

Nor

We used hill work up until two days before the State Meet.  However, the length of the hills decrease and the pace increased over the last three weeks.

Tus

Until November 1st.

 

  1. Do you use any special technique when running up hill?

Arr

Head looking about 15 yards ahead, arms at the angle of incline of the hill to be run, arms moving straight rather than comfortably across the body, not too much body lean.

EIT

Lean forward, use arms as if you were skiing with poles; spring off ball of foot.

Har

Shorten stride and quicken arm action.

Mad

Emphasis on the arms.

SLO

The athlete's focus is on maintaining an upright posture with a powerful drive leg.

SP

I usually ask weaker runners to over emphasize the arm and knee action.

Irv

Eyes on the crest of the hill; strong arm swing; lean into the hill – run tall; consistent effort up the hill.

Nor

We "pull the rope".  We try to maintain a steady pace up the hills, leaning slightly into the hill. When we get to the top of the hill, we emphasize taking 10 quick steps to increase the tempo of the legs.  We try to increase our speed after cresting the top of the hill.

 

  1. Did you spend training time on down hill running?

Arr

We practice on easy sloping grass downhill.  Body lean is forward and arms are out away from the body.  Look for soft part of dirt to land. Avoid braking and try to hit softly.  All this leading up to a "letting go" and really flying downhill.

EIT

Yes, spring hard – trying to lean forward – do not brake with legs.

Fil

No.

Mad

Not very much.

SLO

Downhill running would be beneficial if we had access to a gradual grassy hill, but we don't, so this is not used as a part of our training.

SP

I often use races to work on this aspect of formwork.

And

No. This promotes good form, but also too many injuries.

EIC

We go to a park with gentle grass downhills.  We teach forward lean and let the body go.

Fal

Yes, short downhill of 50 yards long. Run downhill aggressively but under control.  Lean forward and try to keep the body perpendicular to the ground.  Stay off the heels. Run as if running on eggshells and trying not to break them.  The runner should try to run lightly so as not to hear the foot strike the ground.

Nor

The last part of the season, we do some speed work that goes gradually downhill on a grassy slope.

 

  1. If you had no hills available, did you substitute anything in its place for similar training affect?

Arr

Yes. We did a lot of running drills.  At least twice a week and usually three times a week.  Drills are walking tall, skipping for height, distance and lunges.  We also include jumping rope in our weight lifting program.

Mad

Bleachers in the stadium and frogies.

And

Weightlifting.

Tus

Step-ups (Harvard step test).

 

  1. Do you have any additional thoughts on hill training?

Arr

 I would do as much as I could if I had the hills.

EIT

Run through and over the top of hills.  Use sprinter form and technique.  Downhill running is as important as uphill.

Fil

Hills must be run easy.  Avoid injury. Run down hill easy.

Mad

 Hills are the best place to train.

SP

At the varsity level, I would rather work on hill running than work out with weights.

EIC

Down hills are the key to hilly courses.  Down hill technique is important but can be tricky to teach because of the pounding on the legs.

Nor

We sell the idea that we save energy and miles by training on hills.

 

FAVORITE WORKOUT:

  1. Describe the workout that you and your team used that was most beneficial and or favorite during the season.

Arr

The horse trail by our school goes five miles in one direction, so we can go on a 10 mile run without any interruptions.  We do this three or four times a season.  It gives me a good indication of our level at that time.  It is also a good motivator, since the kids always improve as the season progresses.  We are trying to run hard for a long period of time.  This builds mental toughness.  The week of the state meet our fifth man ran this workout in 54 minutes.

EIT

8 mile hill workout in the hills that doesn't repeat itself.  Afterwards a swim in the ocean.  This run it tough and is a test of strength and endurance.

Fil

Repeat miles. 3 to 5 repeats are run.  They are run faster as the season progresses.  This workout is run 3 to 4 days before a meet.  It is used to establish pace.  We decrease toward the end of the season.

Har

We use all methods of training. No one is special to us.

Mad

7-8 miles.  Buchanan Dam. 2 miles flat warm-up. 1 mile rolling hills. 3 mile tough hills. 1 to 8 repeat 150 yard hill. 1-2 cool down on rolling hills.  This workout was used 12 times during the season.  The run becomes longer each week.

SLO

The workout that we have that I feel the most in terms of physiological and psychological benefits is the out and back steady state runs that we do starting late in the summer and continue through midseason.  During the summer, these runs are timed runs on the beach.  The athletes run out as an easy to medium pace and come back at a faster pace.  The top runners run for 60 minutes to cover 9+ miles.  This workout progresses in a tempo run of 4-6 miles on a set course that is run every 2 weeks so the athletes can monitor their improvement.

SP

The team basically looks forward to the end of year workouts, which are short and sweet.  Probably one of the best late season workouts we do is: warm-up, jog and stretching; 1x400 stride – jog around goal posts; 1x300 stride – jog a 100; 1x1200 hard easy hard easy, alternate each 100 – jog a lap; 1x800 hard easy hard easy, alternate each 100 – jog a lap; 10x100 ins-n-outs rest as want between each; warm down as you feel.  The reason I like this, as do the kids, is they can do the workout together yet they run the speed the way they want/feel and can jog as slowly as they want to.  I also use this in earlier workouts with 165's using cones on the track to set up visual aids for them as they run. The reason I use this particular approach involves making the athletes think about transition in racing.  At the championship  level a runner must be able to adjust to all types of race strategies. This workout can be that.  I set it up sometimes as a "rabbit-hare" workout to teach them to catch the runners ahead. This simulates racing, and 1200 meters is long enough to get them to a fatigue level comparable to actual racing.  The effort I ask them to use in the actual "fast 100" is all-out-control.  The effects have always been positive as long as I have used this type of workout. This is not a workout I would use until the athlete has built a very good conditioning base. The athlete's level of achievement has been raised from week to week in workouts previous to this.  Two 800 may be used instead of 1200 and 800.

Taf

Ό mile grass incline. Jog 1.5 mile to and from park; 2 buildups; 2 spring ups; 2 spring downs; 8 x 400 (hard, easy, hard); 3 x 200 hills (hard) finishing in the weight room.

And

Handicap relays; this takes a little homework from the coach. Using each person's best 5km time, divide team and start team members by handicapping the best runner so they run last.

Fal

Figure 8 mile repeat on dirt trail.

Irv

Interval training on our course.  The repeat distances vary.  The following is a sample workout:  one mile warm-up. One mile at pace with rest. 3 x ½ mile at pace with equal time rest.  2 x 400 pace with equal time rest.  Finishes = 1 x 2—finish spring on the last 200 meters of our course.  "Follow the leader" jog down of between 1 and 1 ½ miles.

Tus

Tour of the parks.  Run to park #1 – then do a few intervals – then to park #2 – then park #3 (Each park is different with different intervals at each). The workout combines everything and can be adjusted for every ability on the team.  New and weaker runners may just run to the parks with no intervals until they are stronger.

STRENGTH TRAINING:

  1. Do your athletes use weights for strength development?

Upper Body                 Lower Body        Summer/wk-In                Season/wk

Arr

Yes

 

 

Yes

0        

0

EIT

 

Some

No

-

-

Fil

 

Some

No

-

-

Har

 

Yes

Yes

3-4

 

 

 

2-3

Mad

 

 

Some

Some

-

3

SLO

 

 

No

No

-

-

SP

 

 

Yes

Yes

3

2

Taf

 

 

Yes

Yes

5

3

And

 

 

Yes

Yes

0

3

EIC

 

 

Yes

Yes

3

0

Irv

 

 

No

No

-   

-

Nor

 

 

No

No

-

-

Tus

 

 

No

No

-

-

                 

 

  1. What specific lifts do athletes use?

Arr

Bench, flies, squats, hamstring curls, curls; toe rises, running curls, lat pull downs.

Fil

Press, curls, bench, flys.

SP

Weight machine lifts.

Taf

Bench, military, curls, dips, rowing, stomach curls, leg curls, extensions, leg press, ankle flexion, and toe raises.

And

Bench, curls, leg press, squats, pull downs, lunges.

EIC

Ό squats, hamstring curls, cleans, pull-ups, pushups, setups, dips.

Fal

Curls, upright rows, military, press.

Tus

Bar training, dips, etc.

 

  1. Is your general approach toward sets and reps of 3 x 8, 3 x 20, 5 x 5 or some other combination? Are weight machines, free weights, or combination of both used?

Arr

2-3 x 15 (both).

EIT

We build up to 60 pushups and setups.

Fil

3 x 20 (free weights)

Har

3 x 8-12 (both)

Mad

3 x 12 or 3 x 15 (both)

SP

20 station circuit (20-40 second active stage) (weight machine)

Taf

3 x 8 (weight machine)

And

3 x 10 (both)

EIC

3 x 10-15 (both)

Fal

3 x 10 (free weights)

 

FLEXIBILITY:

  1. Do you have an organized stretching program for your team?

                                                   Purpose                Time Spent               Run Before

Arr

Yes

Both

20-30 minutes

20 minute run

EIT

Yes

Both

15-20 minutes

½ mile

Fil

Yes

Warm-up

10 minutes

1-3 miles

Har

Yes

Warm-up

15 minutes

½ - 2 miles

Mad

Little

Both

5-10 minutes

1 mile

SLO

Yes

Warm-up

30-40 minutes

15-20 minutes

SP

Yes

Warm-up

20 minutes

½ mile

Taf

Yes

Both

15-20 minutes

½ mile

And

Yes

Both

15-20 minutes

½ mile

EIC

Yes

 Range of Motion

10-15 minutes

15-20 minutes

Fal

Yes

Both

20 minutes

1 mile

Irv

Yes

Both

15-20 minutes

No

Nor

Yes

Range of Motion

10-15 minutes

6-15 minutes

Tus

Yes

Range of Motion

15 minutes

No

 

  1. Is any stretching done after workouts? How often? How much?

Arr

Not formally but suggested.

EIT

No

Fil

No

Har

No

Mad

Yes, during rest periods.

SLO

Yes, 20 minutes.

SP

Yes, generally not much however.

Har

Yes, 5 minutes.

And

Yes, on their own.

EIC

Yes, 5-10 minutes.

Fal

Very little.

Irv

Only when tightness is excessive after a workout.

Nor

Yes, more important than our first stretch.

Tus

Yes, but not often enough.

 

6l.        Is your stretching program ballistic or static in nature? If static, how long is each stretch held?           

Arr

Static/ 8-10 seconds

EIT

Static/ 10-15 seconds

Fil

Static

Har

Static/ 20-30 seconds

Mad

Static/ 3-10 seconds

SLO

Static/ 30 seconds

SP

Static/ 30-40 seconds

Taf

Static/ 10 seconds

And

Static/ 15-20 seconds

EIC

Static/ 15-30 seconds

Fal

Static/ 10 seconds

Irv

Static/ 3 x 20-30 seconds

Nor

Static/ 45 seconds

Tus

Static/ 30 seconds

 

  1. Do you have additional thoughts on stretching?

SLO

Stretching after enhances proper recovery from the daily stresses of running.

Nor

 Flexibility is a way to increase the length of stride.  Also, a good flexibility program seems to be very helpful in decreasing injuries

.MOTIVATION:

  1. What one thing has worked the best for you and your team in terms of general motivation?

Arr

Team goals and team unity.

EIT

Personal interest in athletes; write up results and comments on each boy; runner of the week t-shirt; put up photos, results in the locker room; verbally encourage athletes; social get-togethers; I meet personally with each boy at camp and discuss goals, personal interests, etc.

Fil

Meeting the day before the meet and a short meeting before the race.

Har

We try to get our kids to believe in them-selves and in what they are doing in workout.

Mad

Runners weekly ranking and special groups based on these rankings.

SLO

The methods include setting realistic goals and focusing on improving towards those goals.  For race day we try to predict realistically where we should be in the race and mentally practice the race beforehand.  I have tried two approaches to our practice regimen to instill variety, build confidence, and yet maintain some consistency.  We use the same workouts over a 2 week cycle or a 4 week cycle.  By using the same workouts, the athletes can see improvement and become more motivated.  And by varying the workouts every 2 or 4 weeks, the athlete maintains interest.

SP

Setting specific goals as individuals and as a team and placing a time responsibility to/with those goals.  The girls have traditionally prayed together just before going to the line.  The boy's team really did not have a motivational routine.  I seldom do the same things twice, and I try to make the athletes part of the workouts so they " take ownership" of the results.

Taf

I ask for their personal goals and we discuss weekly goals.  We have a weekly newsletter.  Every kid is mentioned and their seasonal record is listed.  I always take 2-3 minutes before the bus leaves for the meet to pump them up.  After the meet I mention all PR's, Records, Team Scores and Highlights.

And

Tradition.  Take the top 7 to "special" places for workouts.  Secret pal gifts. Team dinners the night before big meets.

EIC

We keep things low key and fun.  We give each athlete a person or goal to key on for that week's race.

Fal

Make running fun.

Irv

Goal setting – weekly and for the season.  System of rewards – athlete of the meet, t-shirts, team dinners, patches, team outings, etc.

Nor

The #1 concept we sell in the program is that we are extremely good hill runners who are better rested than our opponents because we are a low mileage team.  We start the season by writing down long term goals.  The goals must include running, academic, and life goals.  They must be specific and they are always stated in a positive manner.  At the halfway point in the season, we start writing down 5 specific positive affirmations for each meet on 3 x 5 cards.  While this is specifically for meets, it certainly helps to motivate during practice as now the runners have committed themselves to specific achievements in their next "test".

Tus

Success is the best motivator, we have four coaches that have years of experience and are highly motivated themselves. We have team get-togethers and dinners.

  

  1. Do you have any additional methods, for better training, that is special to your team;

Arr

Motivation must be done by the individual.  His greatest motivation has got to be not to let down his teammates.

EIT

Motivation and relationship is key to success of any athletic program and I put a tremendous amount of energy into this aspect of my program.

Fil

We use team members to motivate each other.

SP

I believe motivation is only effective if it fits the person and situation. I am not a believer in gimmicks and tricks to motivate. It all boils down to value – to the kids first and the coach.

Nor

Within a positive team, the majority of motivation takes place under the control of individual teammates.  Improvement of times or effort is usually extremely motivational to teammates

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